JDRF: Type 1 to type none

Type 1 diabetes (T1D), sometimes referred to as “juvenile diabetes”, is an autoimmune disease that impacts millions of people around the world. Including this writer and lifelong cyclist.

 

The disease occurs when the body's immune system attacks and destroys the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, a hormone essential to turning food into energy. Without insulin, glucose from food stays in the blood, where it can cause serious damage to all of the body's organ systems.


Type 1 diabetes strikes both children and adults suddenly and is unrelated to diet or lifestyle. It requires constant carbohydrate counting, blood-glucose testing, and lifelong dependence on injected insulin.

 

Cycling is a fantastic way to help control this disease, and the professional cycling Team Type 1 has drawn international attention to what athletes with this disease can accomplish. But whether you have Type 1 diabetes or not, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) Ride to Cure Diabetes can serve the ultimate goal of finding a cure for T1D.

 

JDRF Ride to Cure Diabetes is a destination cycling event in one of seven stunning locations across the United States. Every year, riders come together to raise critical funds to help JDRF find a cure for type 1 diabetes. JDRF Ride is more than a bike ride. It's an unforgettable experience where you'll be surrounded by a passionate community of cyclists, friends and family. Whatever the skill level, whether cycling 25 or 100 miles, JDRF has a Ride for you.

 

Riders choose a fundraising package and set their own mileage goal. Along the way, riders receive the full support of the JDRF Ride Community, from the ride coaches to the fundraising experts who will help you reach and exceed your fundraising goals.

 

Ride locations for  2016 included Lake Tahoe, CA, Burlington, VT, Amelia Island, FL and Tucson, AZ. 2017 destinations are yet to be announced.

 

Visit the JDRF Ride to Cure Diabetes web site to get started planning for next year’s rides today.